New Jersey Drunk Driving Statistics

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Year
Fatalities
Tot
Alc-Rel
%
0.08+
%
1982
1,061
622
59
515
49
1983
932
494
53
434
47
1984
922
451
49
380
41
1985
964
479
50
408
42
1986
1,039
490
47
394
38
1987
1,023
435
43
357
35
1988
1,051
457
43
392
37
1989
891
384
43
315
35
1990
886
366
41
304
34
1991
783
320
41
268
34
1992
763
280
37
222
29
1993
789
290
37
227
29
1994
761
289
38
251
33
1995
774
277
36
223
29
1996
814
283
35
229
28
1997
775
278
36
222
29
1998
741
267
36
207
28
1999
726
283
39
240
33
2000
731
322
44
271
37
2001
745
285
38
235
32
2002
771
281
36
240
31
2003
747
275
37
240
32
2004
731
270
37
227
31
2005
748
263
35
217
29
2006
771
285
37
224
29
2007
724
253
35
199
27
2008
590
197
33
154
26
2009
583
185
32
149
25
2010
556
187
34
153
27
2011
627
227
36
193
31
2012
589
211
36
164
28
2013
542
184
34
146
27
2014
556
201
36
163
29

The table above shows the total number of traffic fatalities (Tot) for the New Jersey, alcohol related fatalities (Alc-Rel) and fatalities in crashes where the highest BAC in the crash was 0.08 or above (0.08+).

All 50 states in the US now apply two statutory offenses to operating a motor vehicle while under the influence of alcohol. The first (and original) offense is known either as driving under the influence (DUI), driving while intoxicated/impaired (DWI), or operating while intoxicated/impaired (OWI). This is based upon a police officer's observations (driving behavior, slurred speech, the results of a roadside sobriety test, etc.)

The second offense is called "illegal per se", which is driving with a BAC of 0.08% or higher. Since 2002 it has been illegal in all 50 states to drive with a BAC that is 0.08% or higher.

It is important to note that the New Jersey drunk driving statistics, as shown above, include data from individuals who were in an alcohol-related crash, but not driving a motor vehicle at the time. The U.S. Department of Transportation defines alcohol-related deaths as "fatalities that occur in crashes where at least one driver or non-occupant (pedestrian or bicyclist) involved in the crash has a positive Blood Alcohol Concentration (BAC) value."

Criminal status of DUI laws in New Jersey

In New Jersey, drunk driving is not a "crime". Citation:State v Hamm 577 A.2d 1259 (NJ 1990) (2)

Sources for New Jersey drunk driving information and statistics

US Dept. of Transportation, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 12/02
(2) National Conference of State Legislatures, 2004

National drunk driving statistics in the US

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